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Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Do I just make an appointment to get an abortion?

You’ve decided to get an abortion.  What’s next?  The steps leading up to making a decision to abort are important parts of the decision making process.  Many times, the decision making process is cut short and the abortion happens without ever knowing if it was even necessary.  Here are some important steps to take prior to having an abortion:

  • Make sure that you are pregnant.  A late period does not always indicate a pregnancy.  Lifestyle, diet, exercise and even medication may also cause changes in the menstrual cycle.  Free pregnancy tests are available at the Pregnancy Clinic.
  • Confirm the viability of the pregnancy. Up to 30% of early pregnancies may end in miscarriage making the abortion unnecessary.1  An ultrasound/sonogram can determine if the pregnancy is living (viable).  A sonogram done at 7 weeks post last menstrual period provides vital information about the pregnancy.  Make an appointment today for a free sonogram at the Pregnancy Clinic.
  • Determine how many weeks pregnant you are.  The sonogram can also help to determine the gestational age of your pregnancy.  The type and cost of an abortion is determined by the age of the pregnancy.
  • Get tested for STD’s. Testing for STD’s is important prior to an abortion.  If you have an untreated STD and then abort, you are at risk for further complications including pelvic inflammatory disease.2,3 Contact the Pregnancy Clinic to have free STD/HIV testing done prior to an abortion procedure.
  • Understand the risks/complications.   It is important that you are aware of the potential risks and complications of abortion.  Talk to someone who does not have a financial interest in your procedure to get the facts.
  • Get the answers to all your questions. Talking to someone you can trust about your decision is an important step.  Having someone to talk to and provide support can give you the confidence you need to be sure you are making the right decision for yourself.

Contact the Pregnancy Clinic today for a confidential, free appointment.

 

1. Wilcox AJ, Weinberg CR, O’Connor JF, et al. Incidence of early loss of pregnancy. N Engl J Med. Jul 28 1988;319(4):189-94. Petrozza, John C. “Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss.” Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss. Medscape Web site.  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/260495-overview  Accessed August 6, 2013. 

2. Stevenson, M. M., and K. W. Radcliffe. “Preventing pelvic infection after abortion.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine Web site. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8547409?dopt=AbstractPlus. Accessed August 4, 2013.  

3. Blackwell, A. L Et. Al. “Universal prophylaxis for Chlamydia trachomatis and anaerobic vaginosis in women attending for suction termination of pregnancy: an audit of short-term health gains.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine Web site. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10471099?dopt=AbstractPlus.  Accessed August 4, 2013.

 

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Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Can I get an abortion without anyone knowing?

In Maryland, if you are a minor, one parent/legal guardian needs to be notified about your procedure. (For more information on notification laws for minors you can refer to our other posts about Parental Notification). However, regardless of your age, you may need to have someone to transport you to the abortion clinic. This is, in part, due to the risks and side effects of the abortion procedure.

Something to consider is that one of the side effects of the abortion pill, Mifiprex, is the suppression of the immune system. This may leave you vulnerable to serious viral and bacterial infections, including sepsis, an infection of the blood which affects the entire body and can cause death.1,2
An unexpected pregnancy can be a stressful thing. This is not the time to distance yourself from your support system, but to seek help from those you trust the most. The Pregnancy Clinic offers free counseling so that you can talk to someone about your pregnancy confidentially. We can also offer you a free ultrasound to see if your pregnancy is viable or if it will miscarry on its own and you can talk to a medical professional about your questions and concerns.

Contact us today for an appointment.

 

1. Dictionary.com http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/incomplete+abortion Accessed August 6, 2013.
2. Sepsis (blood infection) and Septicemia. Web Md. Web site. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/sepsis-septicemia-blood-infection Accessed August 6, 2013.

Categories
Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Should I get an abortion as early in my pregnancy as possible?

Many women schedule abortion procedures as soon as they find out they are pregnant. Statistics say that up to 30% of early pregnancies may end in miscarriage1, which means that an abortion may not be necessary if the pregnancy is not viable or living. Viability can be determined through an ultrasound or sonogram.

Sonograms can be done at seven weeks past the last menstrual period. Prior to that time, it is not always clear whether the pregnancy is living or not. Women who take the time to wait and have a sonogram done, may find that the abortion is not necessary.
Some of the risks of abortion that may be avoided include pain, bleeding and hemorrhage as well as a failed or incomplete abortion2. Infection and aggravation of “silent” STDs are also associated risks of abortion3,4.

Free, pre-abortion ultrasounds may be scheduled by calling any of our clinics. Finding out this information can be helpful in your decision to have an abortion.


1. Mifeprex medication guide. How should I take mifeprex? Food and Drug Administration Web site. http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm088643.pdf. Accessed August 4, 2013.
2. Mifeprex (Mifepristone) Information, Postmarket Drug Safety Information for Patients and Providers. Food and Drug Safety Administration Web site. http://www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/postmarketdrugsafetyinformationforpatientsandproviders/ucm111323.htm. Accessed August 6, 2013.
3. Stevenson, M. M., and K. W. Radcliffe. “Preventing pelvic infection after abortion.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine Web site. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8547409?dopt=AbstractPlus. Accessed August 4, 2013.
4. Blackwell, A. L Et. Al. “Universal prophylaxis for Chlamydia trachomatis and anaerobic vaginosis in women attending for suction termination of pregnancy: an audit of short-term health gains.” National Center for Biotechnology Information. U.S. National Library of Medicine Web site. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10471099?dopt=AbstractPlus. Accessed August 4, 2013.

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Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

If I have an abortion, can I still have children?

Questions about abortions can be answered through education and counseling. Many women find that taking time to talk gives them a sense of control over the issues they are facing. Answers to questions may lead to understanding more about the central issue of a crisis situation. Counseling can help you navigate through the sometimes confusing path of these life events.

Some women show signs of emotional or physical changes after an abortion. They may wonder about whether they can still have children or may avoid the subject of abortion altogether. Drug or alcohol use may increase after an abortion1.

There is help for those considering abortion or recovering from an abortion. Here at the Pregnancy Clinic we offer counseling and ultrasounds to educate and help you gather information. We also offer post-abortion counseling for women trying to understand their feelings following an abortion.

All of our services are free and you can find help by calling one of our clinics today.

 

1. Fergusson DM, et al. Abortion in young women and subsequent mental health. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006;47(1):16-24.
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Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

I’ll know if I have an STD… right?

No Symptoms

While some STDs do produce symptoms, many people with an STD have no symptoms at all. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), many youth in the age range of 15-24 do not know they are infected because they do not have any symptoms.

Two Types

There are two types of infections—bacterial and viral. Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics. In this case, antibiotics treat the disease, but they cannot reverse damage already caused before the medication was taken. Viral infections, on the other hand, cannot be treated by antibiotics. In the case of viral infections, only the symptoms can be treated. Certain viral infections may clear up on their own, just like the common cold, but many other viral infections remain permanently in the body, like HIV.1

Some of the Risks

A few of the risks associated with STDs include infertility, cancer, HIV, pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and increased vulnerability to developing other STDs. Also, many STDs can be passed from mother to child. Getting tested and reducing risk behaviors are critical steps in preventing the spread of STDs. While condoms provide some degree of risk reduction from certain STDs, they do not protect against all STDs, especially those passed by skin to skin contact 2.

So how can you really know whether or not you have an STD? Whether you have symptoms or not, if you are sexually active, you may be at risk. The only way to know for sure is to get tested.

The Pregnancy Clinic offers free testing for syphilis, gonorrhea, hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS, herpes lesions, chlamydia, bacterial vaginosis & yeast. Call today for an appointment at 301-262-1330.

 

1 Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). Center for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/std/default.htm Accessed August 4, 2013.
2. Scientific Evidence on Condom Effectiveness for Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Prevention [Workshop June 2000], Summary report of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. DHHS. July 20, 2001.

Categories
Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

I want an abortion procedure NOW. What do I do?

Slow down! There are several factors to consider before scheduling your abortion procedure.

1. Am I pregnant? Without a reliable pregnancy test, you don’t know if you are pregnant or not! FREE pregnancy testing is available at The Pregnancy Clinic. Call to find out available times.

2. Is my pregnancy viable (alive)? The only way to determine the viability of the pregnancy is through an ultrasound. This non-invasive test is done in our office and is FREE. If your pregnancy is not viable, that could indicate a miscarriage. Up to 30% of early pregnancies may end in miscarriage1. The Pregnancy Clinic offers pre-abortion ultrasounds to determine whether or not a pregnancy is viable or will miscarry naturally. If your pregnancy is not viable, you may be able to avoid the pain and expense of an unnecessary abortion procedure.

3. What happens after I have an abortion procedure? There are both physical and emotional risks and side effects associated with abortion procedures, including:
• Damage to organs, anesthesia complications, and even death2,3,4,5
• Depression, anxiety, guilt, grief, and anger6,7,8,9

Scientific evidence indicates that abortion is more likely to be associated with negative psychological outcomes when compared to miscarriage or carrying an unintended pregnancy to term.10,11,12,13,14
It might feel like abortion is the only answer right this minute, but before you make a decision, get the facts about how an abortion might impact your life, both now and later.

FREE counseling is available at The Pregnancy Clinic. Call or come in to speak with someone who is not connected to your situation financially, prior to scheduling an appointment for an abortion.

1. Wilcox AJ, Weinberg CR, O’Connor JF, et al. Incidence of early loss of pregnancy. N Engl J Med. Jul 28 1988;319(4):189-94. Petrozza, John C. “Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss.” Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss. Medscape Web site. http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/260495-overview Accessed August 6, 2013.
2. Paul M, Lichtenberg S, Borgatta L, Grimes DA, Stubblefield PG, Creinin MD, eds. Management of Unintended and Abnormal Pregnancy: Comprehensive Abortion Care. UK:Wiley-Blackwell; 2009.
3. Katz V, et al. Comprehensive Gynecology. 5th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby-Elsevier; 2007.
4. Induced Abortion, Patient Education Pamphlet. American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. November 2008.
5. Dilation & Curettage, Patient Education Pamphlet. American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. December 2005.
6. Cougle JR, et al. Depression associated with abortion and childbirth: a long-term analysis of the NLSY cohort. Med Sci Monit. 2003;9(4):105-12.
7. Fergusson DM, et al. Abortion in young women and subsequent mental health. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2006;47(1):16-24.
8. Pedersen W. Abortion and depression: a population-based longitudinal study of young women. Scand J Public Health. 2008;36(4):424-8.
9. Rees DI, Sabia JJ. The relationship between abortion and depression: new evidence from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Med Sci Monit. 2007;13(10):430-6.
10. Coleman PK. Resolution of unwanted pregnancy during adolescence through abortion versus childbirth: individual and family predictors and psychological consequences. J Youth Adolesc. 2006;35:903-11.
11. Reardon DC, Coleman PK, Cougle J. Substance use associated with prior history of abortion and unintended birth: a national cross sectional cohort study. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2004;26:369-83.
12. Cougle J, Reardon DC, Coleman PK. Generalized anxiety associated with unintended pregnancy: a cohort study of the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. J Anxiety Disord. 2005;19(10):137-42.
13. Broen AN, Moum T, Bodtker AS, Ekeberg O. Psychological impact on women of miscarriage versus induced abortion: a 2-year follow-up study. Psychosom Med. 2004;66(2):265-71
14. Broen AN, Moum T, Bodtker AS, Ekeberg O. The course of mental health after miscarriage and induced abortion: a longitudinal, five-year follow-up study. BMC Med. 2005;3:18.
Categories
Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

What difference does my personal medical history make if I want an abortion?

You may have already decided that you want to have an abortion, but before you move ahead, there is another important step in the process. Many women do not stop to consider their personal medical history before they make a final decision. Because abortion is a serious medical procedure, some of the risks of abortion may be higher for women with certain medical conditions or certain factors in their medical history. Some things that should be explored include:

• When were you last tested for STDs?
• Do you have Rh negative blood type?
• Do you have or are you at risk for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease?
• Do you have an ectopic pregnancy?
• Do you desire to have children in the future?
• Have you had an abortion before?

These issues and others should be considered before you have an abortion. The Pregnancy Clinic offers free counseling, ultrasounds, and STD testing prior to abortions. Understanding your personal medical history can be an important part of your future.

 

Categories
Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Can I change my mind after taking the Abortion Pill?

1. Are you pregnant? A missed period often causes a woman to think she may be pregnant. However, there can be other reasons for a missed period. Have a test done and get the results confirmed before you make an abortion decision. At the Pregnancy Clinic our tests are laboratory grade urine tests and they are free!

2. How far along is your pregnancy? Knowing how far along you are in the pregnancy is an important aspect of the decision making process. Up to 30% of early pregnancies end in miscarriage, so if your pregnancy is early, some other things should be considered. At the Pregnancy Clinic, many of our clients qualify for a free ultrasound to determine how far along a pregnancy is and if it is viable (alive).1 Find out for free if your pregnancy will even continue before you make an abortion decision.

3. Do you have an STD? If you are planning to have a surgical abortion and have not been checked for STDs since you became pregnant, you should take this important step first. An untreated STD can be aggravated by a surgical abortion, causing damage to your body now and also putting your future reproductive health at risk.2 We test for STDs at the Pregnancy Clinic and testing is free!

Having the answers to these questions is a critical part of your decision making process. At the Pregnancy Clinic we want to provide you with helpful information that will promote good physical and mental health.

Call today for an appointment to meet with a counselor and get the answers to your questions. All services are free.


1. Wilcox AJ, Weinberg CR, O’Connor JF, et al. Incidence of early loss of pregnancy. N Engl J Med. Jul 28 1988;319(4):189-94. Petrozza, John C. “Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss.” Recurrent Early Pregnancy Loss. Medscape
2. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease. National Institutes of Health Medline Plus Web site. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/pelvicinflammatorydisease.html. Accessed July 20, 2013.

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Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Do I have to tell my parent?

While state laws vary, if you are under 18, the laws of the state where you are seeking an abortion, not the state you live in, will apply. In Maryland, the law states that if you are under 18 years old, one parent (or legal guardian) must be notified of your decision to have an abortion prior to the procedure. However, you may qualify for an exception in the professional judgment of the abortion provider.1 You can see our previous blog post about more details regarding parental notification.

The reason for these types of laws is that abortion is a serious medical procedure. If there are complications, you may need a parent or another adult to help you seek medical attention.

Although it can be difficult to talk to parents about an unplanned pregnancy, you are not alone. At The Pregnancy Clinic, you can speak openly about all of your options with a caring counselor who will protect your privacy. Pregnancy Clinic counselors can also help you make a plan for how to discuss your situation with the important people in your life.

The sonogram is another important aspect of your decision making process. Before you make any decision about how to move forward, get a sonogram to find out whether or not your pregnancy is viable (alive). You may not even need an abortion since up to 30% of pregnancies end in miscarriage. A pregnancy test cannot tell you if your pregnancy is going to miscarry. Sonograms are available free at The Pregnancy Clinic and do not require parental notification.

Set up your free consultation and free sonogram today.

 

1. Abortion Consent Laws. American Women’s Services Web site. http://www.americanwomensservices.com/faq/abortion_consent_laws.php Accessed August 6, 2013

Categories
Clinic Pregnancy Pregnant

Do I need anyone else’s consent in order to get an abortion?

There are two types of parental involvement laws regarding abortion: notification and consent. If you are not an emancipated minor under 18, these laws apply to you. A “Parental Notification” law means that a parent or guardian must be notified before a minor undergoes an abortion procedure. A “Parental Consent” law means that a parent or guardian must give permission before a minor undergoes the procedure.

State laws vary on parental involvement for minors under 18 who are seeking abortion services. If you are under 18, the law in the state where you are seeking an abortion, not the state in which you live, will apply. If parental consent or notification is required, the consent or notification of any other person will not be accepted as a substitute.

In Maryland, the law states that if you are less than 18 years old, one parent (or legal guardian) must be notified of your decision to have an abortion prior to the procedure. Some minors may qualify for an exception in the professional judgment of the abortion provider.1

If you do not live in Maryland, here is a list of other states and their laws regarding parental involvement.

However, there is no parental involvement required for you to make an appointment at the Pregnancy Clinic. You can come to our clinic to get the facts, find out how to talk to your parents, and find out whether or not you’re pregnant and if the pregnancy is living. We can help!

Make an appointment today.

CALL US TODAY

 

1. Abortion Consent Laws. American Women’s Services Web site. http://www.americanwomensservices.com/faq/abortion_consent_laws.php Accessed August 6, 2013.